DUO BRUTUS—a brute of a heavy workout

A brute of a workout that leaves you laying on the ground wondering “what just happened?“.

On this page: full workout, exercises, movement standards, videos, photos, downloadable PDF.

 

The workout consists of three tasks, your first is 4 minutes, second is 6 minutes, and your final task is 20 minutes while working with a partner. Working with a partner is something that isn’t done enough, or at least not intelligently, to me deadlifting a heavy weight together is not great partner work, but that’s for another article.

Your first task is with one heavy kettlebell—great unilateral work—you’ll be switching from side to side trying to complete the full 4 minutes without putting the kettlebell down. Your second task is again unilateral work with a heavy kettlebell, you’ll be bringing the weight from dead to overhead upon each rep, how you do it doesn’t matter, as long as it’s done safely. The third and final task is a brute of a task, and working as a duo. While one partner is performing deadlifts with two kettlebells, the other performs farmer walks with one heavy kettlebell. Either partner decides when to switch, but as soon as that bell is put down or changes hands during the walk, a partner switch is required. Communicate with your partner.

Here is the full workout:

Task one is performed with one heavy kettlebell, Rx 24kg male, 16kg female.

  • Single Arm Kettlebell Swing
  • Switch
  • Swing Clean

4 Min. AMRAP
2 minutes rest

 

Task two is performed with one heavy kettlebell, Rx 24kg male, 16kg female.

  • Dead to Overhead

6 Min. AMRAP
3 minutes rest

 

Task three is performed with a partner.
Two kettlebells for the racked deadlift, Rx male 40kg, 32kg female
One kettlebell for the farmer walk, Rx male 32kg, 24kg female
Total weight specified, i.e. 24kg + 16kg equals 40kg, 20+20 etc.

  • One athlete performs racked deadlifts with two kettlebells
  • The other athlete performs farmer walks with one heavy kettlebell

20 Min. AMRAP

Add all scores up at the end to get your result for the workout, the last task is a shared result, do don’t let your partner down. Perform the workout again in two weeks and see if you’ve progressed.

 

Dead to Overhead

Only the start and end position is defined, you decide how the weight gets from the ground to overhead. A good overhead lockout is required upon each rep. The weight can be cleaned any way possible, from assisted dead clean, swing dead clean, to dead clean. The weight can be brought overhead any way possible, from press, push press, to jerk, or going directly from dead to overhead with a snatch.

Partner Work

The third task of the workout is with a partner, good communication required. One athlete picks up the kettlebell and starts walking a pre-defined route (circle, squat, rectangle etc.), the moment the weight is picked up, the other athlete starts deadlifting, counting each rep. When the walking athlete changes hands or puts the weight down, a partner switch is required. When switching, the athlete deadlifting will provide the number of reps performed to the other athlete, the athlete starts counting its deadlifts at the next rep of the total. For example, if the total was 43, then he/she will count 44, 45, and so on, again passing the running total on to the partner upon each switch. Athletes should be partnered wisely with similar strength, so that they can both use the same kettlebells.

Deadlifts

The deadlifts are with one kettlebell racked and one kettlebell dead on the ground. Pick your weights wisely, it’s 20 minutes of work! Rx for males is 32kg farmer walks, 40kg deadlifts, this can be one 16kg and one 24kg, or any other combination that makes up 40kg. Rx for females is 24kg farmer walks, 32kg deadlifts.

The reason for having one kettlebell racked rather than both hanging is, a racked kettlebell prompts the athlete to have a good upright posture, perform a good deep squat, keeping the shoulders high while moving the hips low.

 

Movement Standards:

Single Arm Kettlebell Swing

  • Base of the kettlebell passing the knees on the back-swing
  • Bell near chest level at the top of the up-swing

Switch

  • Switch happens at the end up of the upswing

Swing Clean

  • Base of the kettlebell passing the knees on the back-swing
  • Kettlebell ends in full racking position with a split second pause

Dead to Overhead

  • Full hip, knee, and elbow extension in overhead position
  • Hand positioned above the shoulder
  • Kettlebell starts completely dead on the ground upon each rep

Racked Deadlift

  • One kettlebell remains racked during the deadlift
  • Full hip and knee extension at the end of the lift
  • Hanging weight returning dead to the ground upon each rep

Farmer Walk

  • One kettlebell hanging with full arm extension
  • No hand switch allowed
  • Keep walking

A video of the workout www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFUJIo6iRyc

Or if you like short clips of each exercise on Instagram:

 

Exercises

Exercise combo: Swing, Switch and Clean

Racked Position
Racked position

Drop
Drop

Hip flexion and insert
Hip flexion and insert

Hip extension
Hip extension

Hip flexion
Hip flexion

Hip extension and switch
Hip extension and switch

Hip flexion
Hip flexion

Hip extension, bell to body proximity, and clean
Hip extension, bell to body proximity, and clean

Rack and repeat
Rack and repeat

…continued below

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Exercise: Racked Deadlift

Initial dead swing clean
Initial dead swing clean

Hip flexion
Hip flexion

Clean
Clean

Rack
Rack

Squat, create tension
Squat, create tension

Deadlift, end with full hip, and knee extension
Deadlift, end with full hip, and knee extension

Squat and repeat
Squat and repeat

 

Download the FREE printable PDF with info and workout.

Check out some of the other kettlebell WODs below:

Check out “Kettlebell Exercises to Include in Your WODs (39 videos, 120+ minutes)
Kettlebell exercises for wods

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comments

2 COMMENTS

  1. i was wondering about my feet position. when i turn my feet outwards it seems to bother a knee i injured about 40 yrs ago. when i point my toes straight ahead, line em up with a tile line, it is easier on my knee. is it because as i take the weight on my legs i might be overextending my knee when they are turned out ? thanks ,taco !